Home General Interest New escalators for Marylebone Tube station

New escalators for Marylebone Tube station

Transport for London is about to commence work to improve access to Marylebone Tube station by installing one new escalator and replacing two more.

The vital three-year programme will first deliver a new escalator to replace the existing central staircase. Work will then begin on replacing the two existing escalators, which date back to 1943, one at a time, to reduce the impact on customers The result will be that the station, which supports 13.7 million customer journeys each year and provides an important interchange with national rail services, will have three new escalators.

Preliminary, behind-the-scenes site work is already underway and will be followed by the relocation of the station’s ticket barriers from mid-August to create additional space to work. Main construction is due to start in mid-September.

The station will remain open for the duration of the work and there will always be two escalators in operation – one going up, one going down. The work is scheduled to be completed by autumn 2023.

Esther Sharples, director of asset operations at London Underground, said: “We’d like to thank our customers for their patience while this vital escalator work is being carried out. The escalators we’re replacing are some of the oldest on the Tube network and this is essential work that will improve journeys through Marylebone station for years to come. Once the work is complete, the station will have improved capacity and reliability, which is particularly important at this busy interchange.”

London Underground’s escalators are heavy-duty machines and tend to be in operation in both directions for up to 20 hours a day. They weigh around 40 tonnes and carry millions of people each year. A typical 15-metre rise escalator has approximately 15,000 moving parts.

As part of additional improvement works at Marylebone station, TfL will also expand the ticket barriers at the station by demolishing the former disused ticket office. This will reduce congestion in the peak periods once all the works are complete.

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttp://therailengineer.com

SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews


Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST.

A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series.

Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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