Home General Interest Another bridge demolished as West Midlands Metro extension advances

Another bridge demolished as West Midlands Metro extension advances

Demolition of the Tame Valley canal bridge is the latest step in the work to extend the West Midlands Metro from Wednesbury to Brierley Hill.

The fourth in a series of redundant structures to have been removed along the 11km line in recent months, removal of the Tame Valley canal bridge follows the demolition of a similar installation on the Walsall Canal late last year, which was completed ahead of schedule. The Old Main Line Canal bridge in Tipton will be the last of the canal structures to be cleared as part of the scheme with work expected to get underway in February.

A crane arrived on site on Monday 18 January heralding the start of the demolition which will take several days to complete. The canal, which has been closed to boat and towpath traffic to allow the works to take place, is expected to reopen in the coming weeks.

Andy Street, the Mayor of the West Midlands, said: “It is brilliant to see that, despite the pandemic, we are able to press ahead with the construction of the Wednesbury to Brierley Hill Metro extension. Not only is the extension the biggest light rail project in the UK, but it is also a creator of local jobs and driver of our regional economy at such a challenging time.

“The Wednesbury to Brierley Hill Metro extension will be a huge connectivity boost for the people of Dudley and Sandwell, and it also forms a key part of my wider plans for public transport across the West Midlands after decades of under investment. I am delighted we have reached another milestone on the extension and want to say a huge thank you to all the staff who have helped make this happen despite the pandemic.”

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttp://therailengineer.com
SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST. A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series. Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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