Home Heritage Video: Flying Scotsman returns

Video: Flying Scotsman returns

Painstakingly overhauled and repainted in BR livery, Flying Scotsman has returned to its former stamping ground on the East Coast Main Line with a run from London King’s Cross to York.

This legend of the railway’s past is back in steam again after benefiting from a £4.2 million restoration programme. It’s been a long haul, due in part to the extensive modification and variable maintenance it received under private ownership.

Designed by Sir Nigel Gresley, Flying Scotsman emerged from Doncaster works as an A1 locomotive in 1923. It hauled the inaugural non-stop London to Edinburgh service on 1st May 1928 and became the first steam locomotive to officially reach 100 mph six years later.

Having covered more than two million miles, it entered private ownership in the Sixties and went on to tour both North America and Australia. Today the locomotive is in the hands of the National Railway Museum, bought in 2004 through a sealed-bid auction for £2.3 million.

Ahead of Flying Scotsman is a busy summer, starring in a season of events at the National Railway Museum before venturing out onto the main line again for a nationwide tour, most of it already sold out.

Previous articleNew UTC for Crewe
Next articleRe-opening Lamington
Graeme Bickerdikehttp://therailengineer.com
SPECIALIST AREAS Tunnels and bridges, historic structures and construction techniques, railway safety Graeme Bickerdike's association with the railway industry goes back to the mid-nineties when he was contracted to produce safety awareness videos and printed materials aimed at the on-track community. This led to him heading a stream of work to improve the way safety rules are communicated and understood - ultimately simplifying them - for which he received the IRSE’s Wing Award for Safety in 2007. In 2005, Graeme launched a website to catalogue and celebrate some of the more notable disused railway structures which still grace Britain’s landscape. Several hundred have since had their history researched and a photographic record captured. A particular focus has been the construction methods adopted by Victorian engineers and contractors; as a result, the site has become a useful resource for those with asset management responsibilities. Graeme has been writing for Rail Engineer for the past ten years, generally looking at civil engineering projects and associated issues. He has a deep appreciation of the difficulties involved in building tunnels and viaducts through the 19th Century, a trait which is often reflected in his stories.

1 COMMENT

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Must Read

What is the judicious mix?

The Rail Engineer feature “Getting electrification done: the net-zero imperative” with its electrification map attracted a great deal of interest. An updated...

The Kilsby Genie

Here at Rail Engineer magazine, we seem to have a thing about tunnels - especially tunnels with blocked drains. Back in 2012,...

3Squared wins major contract from HS2 contractor

A Yorkshire-based SME (small to medium enterprise) has been awarded a major contract working on High Speed Two (HS2), generating new jobs

Value of Call Out Contracts! Brandon Emergency – West Coast main line

RBS1 is the Rugby, Birmingham, Stafford line, often referred to as the Birmingham loop. The West Coast main line (WCML) starts at...

Rhomberg Sersa’s Swiss Army Knife

Catching up with Europe’s materials handling When someone who has had over forty years in the railway industry says...