Home General Interest Proposed changes to major bottleneck on Brighton main line

Proposed changes to major bottleneck on Brighton main line

Network Rail is seeking to remove the UK’s most operationally challenging railway junction as a public consultation on the scheme enters its final month.

Located to the north of East Croydon station, the flat junctions regularly cause delays to the 1,700 trains that pass through the area each weekday, as trains often need to stop to allow others to pass in front of them. This creates a bottleneck that amplifies delays on the Brighton Main Line, its branches and the wider network.

The proposed solution is to replace the flat junctions with new viaducts, bridges and dive-unders to separate the tracks This would create clear routes for trains and remove the current need for trains to wait at red signals for others to pass, resulting in a significant boost in service reliability.

John Halsall, Network Rail managing director, southern region, said: “I’m really pleased to see we’ve already had a strong response to the public consultation, and encourage both Brighton Main Line passengers and communities along the line of route who have yet to do so, to take the time to give us their feedback.

“We know these proposals are critical as they are the only way to deliver a combination of more reliable, more frequent and faster services for passengers on the Brighton main line and its branches.”

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttp://therailengineer.com

SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews


Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST.

A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series.

Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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