Home General Interest Newcastle Central Station access improvements obtain Listed Building Consent

Newcastle Central Station access improvements obtain Listed Building Consent

Proposed access improvements to Newcastle Central station have taken a major step forward after planners have granted Listed Building Consent in this, the station’s, 170th year.

Last year Newcastle City Council and partners announced plans to open-up access to the Victorian station, improve traffic flows in front, accommodate more passengers and change taxi pick-up points and short stay parking. Residents, taxi drivers and Historic England were consulted

Now planners have given the green light to two new entrances into the station. One in the west which will take passengers from Central Parkway into the station to a new concourse, and a second at the front of the station on Neville Street where a car rental business is currently located.

Artist impression of Neville Street entrance.

In January, the city council’s cabinet approved a revised development framework that gives developers guidance on investing in the Forth Yards area south west of the station. That could lead to a new a multi-storey car park, office space and up to 2,500 homes on the 22-hectare site.

Welcoming the Listed Building Consent, Cabinet Member for Employment and Culture, Cllr Ged Bell, said: “This is great news for the city.

“Newcastle Central Station is the gateway to the region. With rising passenger numbers, we need to ensure it offers a pleasant experience while playing its part to help the city recover and grow after the pandemic.

“The new entrances will open the station up to the wider area – Stephenson Quarter, and the Forth Yards area that will be the city’s next big development site providing quality homes with views of the river.

“By improving traffic flows at the front of the station we hope to cut carbon emissions, helping the city become carbon-zero by 2030 and tackling climate change.

“Central Station was opened by Queen Victoria and is a Grade I listed building. Although some demolition will be required, opening it up will expose original features that have been hidden away for years and will take the building back to the way it looked in 1850.”

Claire Ansley, director of customer experience at LNER, which manages the station, added: “We are pleased that the plans to enhance Newcastle Central Station have been approved. The enhancements we’re making will help make the station more accessible from the surrounding areas and provide an even warmer welcome to the thousands of people travelling to and from the city every day.”

Paul McKeown, investment director for Network Rail, said: “This is a fantastic project and receiving listed building consent brings us one step closer to realising these improvements.

“We’re delighted to be a part of this vital scheme and will continue to work closely with both Newcastle City Council and LNER on these improvements, which will open up the station and make it more pleasant for passengers.” With Listed Building Consent now granted it’s expected work on site will begin later in the year. 

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttp://therailengineer.com

SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews


Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST.

A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series.

Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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