Home General Interest Russia: only railway bridge to Murmansk collapses

Russia: only railway bridge to Murmansk collapses

The sole railway bridge that connects Murmansk in northern Russia with the rest of the country has collapsed due to the weight of water in the Kola river.

As a result, no passenger or freight trains can reach the Artic city, home to 300,000 people, for the foreseeable future.

Trains are being terminated short of the bridge and passengers are having to complete their journeys by bus as the road bridge is still intact. What arrangements are being made for freight are unknown.

Murmansk, which lies north of the Arctic Circle, has a relatively mild climate due to the Gulf Stream. However, the surrounding area still has a high snowfall and it is this that is melting, raising the water level in the river.

Photo Credit: 51.mchs.gov.ru

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttp://therailengineer.com

SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews


Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST.

A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series.

Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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