Home Contract News Repairs to Cumbrian Coast line near completion

Repairs to Cumbrian Coast line near completion

Network Rail has announced that repairs will soon be complete on a section of the Cumbrian Coast line left badly damaged by three consecutive storms earlier this year.

The high tides, strong winds and heavy rain caused by Storms Ciara, Dennis and Jorge severely damaged a bridge carrying the railway at Parton. Both lines have been closed since March so the bridge could be completely replaced to make the railway safe and reliable again.

Parton inspection.

More than 36,000 tonnes of rock armour is being placed to protect the railway from being pounded by powerful waves.

The large boulders, sourced from a Cumbrian quarry, will better protect the exposed section of coastal railway and mean more reliable journeys for passengers and freight in the future.

Phil James, Network Rail’s route director for the North West route, said: “Repairs at Parton are progressing well, and I look forward to the whole of the Cumbrian Coast line – a key passenger and freight route being open to services once more.

Parton aerial view.

“I’m especially impressed that our teams have been able to undertake all of this work while following social distancing guidelines introduced by government.

“It demonstrates just how well we can work together, even in such testing times.”

Network Rail’s repair work at Parton is due to complete by the end of May, when train services will resume between Whitehaven and Workington.

Taking advantage of the full railway closure, work on sea defences scheduled for later this year has been brought forward. Later in June, the line between Millom and Sellafield will be closed for 9 days due to work planned work to renew the track at Eskmeals, near Ravenglass for Eskdale station.

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttp://therailengineer.com

SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews


Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST.

A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series.

Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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