Home General Interest New platform roofs for St Denys

New platform roofs for St Denys

Work has begun at St Denys station in Southampton to refurbish the platform canopies which, due to the age and condition of the timber structure, often leak.

The age of the structure means the roofs require more maintenance due to the timber being exposed to the elements. In bad weather, puddles form on the platforms, which is a hazard for passengers.

The full 38 metre length of the canopies on Platforms 2/3 to 4 will be renewed in GRP ((glass reinforced plastic) and aluminium and should be complete by Easter 2021.

Jonathan Spencer, scheme project manager for Network Rail Wessex, said: “The new platform canopies will provide a better passenger experience for years to come, as due to the age and condition of them,  maintaining them was no longer an option.

“It’s great to be part of a project which will improve passengers’ journeys, demonstrating Network Rail’s commitment to putting passengers first. While the majority of the work is taking place at night, we will try to keep noise to a minimum and apologise for any disruption. “

Chris Ellis, regional manager south at SWR said: “This work represents a significant upgrade to St Denys station which will not only help to keep customers dry in wet weather, but also make the station safer to use.

“Our stations sit at the heart of the communities we serve, and they are key to maintaining exceptional customer service. That’s why we are committed to enhancing stations across our network through improvements such as this one”.

The station will remain open during the work, although there will be scaffolding so passengers waiting for trains to Southampton, Portsmouth and London Waterloo are reminded to take care while on the platforms.

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttp://therailengineer.com

SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews


Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST.

A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series.

Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Network Rail enhancement budget cut by £1bn

Rail Minister Chris Heaton-Harris has confirmed, in a written answer to a question from Shadow Secretary of State for Transport Jim McMahon,...