Home General Interest Historic rail bridge improved near Darlington

Historic rail bridge improved near Darlington

Teams from Network Rail have carried out improvement work on Skerne Bridge in Darlington, the oldest railway bridge in the world in continuous use, before its 195th anniversary this weekend.

They have removed plants and weeds which were growing out of the stonework on the bridge and have cut back some of the trees next to the railway, work that has made Skerne Bridge more visible for people in Darlington and will help to keep trains running safely and reliably.

Teams have also removed the graffiti on the bridge and repainted sections of it. Network Rail has worked closely with the A1 Steam Locomotive Trust and Darlington Borough Council to brighten up the area and bring the bridge closer to its former glory. 

Skerne Bridge officially opened on 27 September 1825 to carry the Stockton and Darlington Railway over the River Skerne. This was also the first time that members of the public could travel by steam train. The bridge is on Historic England’s ‘100 Places’ list and appeared on the five-pound note.

Skerne Bridge before improvement work, photo credit A1 Steam Locomotive Trust.

Today, services on the Darlington to Bishop Auckland line run over Skerne Bridge, which is around half a mile from the East Coast main line.

Paul Rutter, Network Rail’s route director for the East Coast route, said: “Skerne Bridge is a vital part of our railway history, and I’m proud of our teams for carrying out this work ahead of the 195th anniversary, so it can be celebrated by people in Darlington and showcased to those visiting the town.

“The bridge carried the first passenger trains and it will remain an essential part of Darlington’s railway for years to come.”

Graeme Bunker-James, The A1 Steam Locomotive Trust, said: ‘’The A1 Steam Locomotive Trust is pleased to have been able to help deliver a step change in the appearance of this important structure as the countdown to 2025 gets underway.

“As the custodians of Darlington’s modern manufacture of steam locomotives, it is wonderful to see the world-famous location recognised as the birthplace of the public railway fit for the celebrations.”

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttp://therailengineer.com

SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews


Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST.

A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series.

Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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