Home Company News Greater Anglia uses new ‘fogging guns’ to clean trains

Greater Anglia uses new ‘fogging guns’ to clean trains

In response to the need to keep trains and stations cleaner than usual during the Coronavirus outbreak, Greater Anglia has invested in two “fogging guns” (with three more on order), which are used for spraying and sanitising large areas.

These use cleaning chemicals which kill different types of viruses to clean areas which are difficult to reach, quickly and efficiently. The machines can be used to clean trains at any depot, station or train stabling point on the Greater Anglia network. They could also be used, if necessary, in waiting rooms, offices, mess rooms or in other railway buildings.

Since the start of the coronavirus outbreak Greater Anglia has stepped up cleaning of trains and stations, especially high contact areas such as grab rails, door buttons and handles and ticket gates and topping up soap, water and toilet roll in toilets more frequently.

Cleaning with fog guns.

Martin Moran, Greater Anglia’s commercial, customer services and train presentation director, said: “We are doing all we can to keep trains clean for key workers and those who need to make essential journeys.

“If a person with suspected coronavirus travels on one of our trains, the train would be quarantined. Once it has been released, it undergoes a thorough deep-clean and part of this process involved using the “fogging guns”.

“We’re so grateful to our teams and other key workers, in many different roles, who are working tirelessly at this time to help others.”

Greater Anglia is currently running a reduced service to help key workers and those making essential journeys travel reliably and on time.

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttp://therailengineer.com

SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews


Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST.

A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series.

Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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