Home General Interest First step towards new HS2 station at Euston completed

First step towards new HS2 station at Euston completed

Preparations at London Euston for the construction of HS2 have taken the next step with the demolition of the station’s western ramp and canopy.

Removal of the structure, which has been in place since the modernisation of Euston in the 1960s as part of the electrification of the West Coast main line, took 13 weeks and paves the way for the construction of the new HS2 Euston station.

Due to Covid-19 restrictions, work on site was paused on 23 March but restarted on 16 April once Government-approved safe working practices were in place. The work was carried out by Network Rail, HS2 and its contractor Skanska.

The western ramp was used to access the parcel deck on the first floor of the station. The area was once used as a Royal Mail parcel sorting depot, taking parcels from the trains on three dedicated platforms for parcel freight.

Skanska – Euston Station, Cutline – West Ramp Demolition 2020 02-05 – V7

The ramp allowed vehicle access to the upper deck, but the parcel depot was taken out of use when post began being transported on road due to increased passenger demand.

Patrick Cawley, HS2 and Network Rail On Network Works director, said: “The completion of this work is of major significance to the HS2 project and marks the first piece of structural work to Euston station in order for the new high speed station to be built. It has been an important and successful piece of collaborative work between the teams at HS2, Network Rail and Skanska.

“HS2 will transform the way we travel in the UK, helping to improve the current train network and providing new low carbon journeys and improving air quality for future generations.”

Patrick Vallely, senior programme manager for HS2 enabling works and the station redevelopment said: “I’m excited to be a part of the joint NR , HS2 and Skanska team that through great collaboration , effort and use of joint skills successfully dismantled the west ramp and canopy to meet the original completion date – despite a necessary pause in works for 3-4 weeks to implement essential Covid-19 safety measures.”

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttp://therailengineer.com

SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews


Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST.

A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series.

Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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