Home General Interest First phase of work on Barmouth Viaduct completed

First phase of work on Barmouth Viaduct completed

The first stage of a £25 million upgrade to the Barmouth Viaduct in Wales has been successfully completed.

The first phase of work on the viaduct, which is a vital transport link for North West Wales, was extended by 48 hours to allow more work to be carried out while passenger numbers are lower because of the firebreak lockdown.

The entire restoration involves replacing more than 1,000 timber and metal elements of the viaduct, which are rotting or decaying, as well as the entire 820m length of track. Network Rail is doing this on a like for like basis to maintain the viaduct’s magnificent appearance.

Barmouth Phase 1 completion.

Bill Kelly, Network Rail’s route director for Wales and Borders, said: “The restoration of Barmouth Viaduct will help us protect our industrial heritage and make sure this vital transport link can continue to serve local people and visitors in the future.

“We have been planning this work for years and I am delighted that the first stage of the upgrade has now been completed. A project of this scale is never without challenges, but more so this year and I am proud of our team for getting the work done safely, following Government guidelines, during the Covid-19 pandemic.

“There is more work to do of course and we will be back next year to continue the £25m upgrade.”

James Price, Transport for Wales CEO, said: “I’m delighted that Network Rail is making great progress in its work to safeguard the future of this iconic structure and the Cambrian Coast Line. This investment sits alongside our own investment in transforming services throughout the Wales and Borders network, including brand new trains for the Cambrian Coast Line in the years to come.”

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttp://therailengineer.com

SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews


Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST.

A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series.

Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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