Home Environment Embankment stabilisation continues in the Derbyshire Peak District

Embankment stabilisation continues in the Derbyshire Peak District

Engineers from Network Rail are upgrading the railway embankment to improve future journeys on the line between Manchester and Buxton by protecting the railway from landslips in the picturesque Derbyshire Peak District.

Embankments are being made less steep and the ground made more secure in two locations near Chapel-en-le-Frith. During the work, Network Rail has kept the railway open to minimise disruption to essential passenger and freight services on the route.

Stephen Townley, senior programme manager at Network Rail, said: “This essential work as part of the Great North Rail Project will make this busy passenger and freight route more reliable in the future.

Buxton embankment work taking place.

“In these challenging times, the importance of freight traffic has been brought into sharp focus, so completing this work safely with minimal disruption to trains is hugely important.

“We’re also working differently so that we can continue to deliver essential work while following guidelines on social distancing. This is to protect our railway staff who are working tirelessly to keep the country moving during the Covid-19 crisis.”

Robert Largan, MP for High Peak, said: “This is really positive news. These works will help improve train reliability on the Buxton line, which will be very welcome for my constituents who travel from Buxton, Dove Holes, Chapel-en-le-Frith, Whaley Bridge, Furness Vale and New Mills.

“I’m very grateful to those who are continuing to work on this essential project, during this very difficult time.”

The work began in January 2020 and is expected to complete in May.

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttp://therailengineer.com

SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews


Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST.

A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series.

Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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