Home Contract News Contract signed for first two HS2 tunnelling machines

Contract signed for first two HS2 tunnelling machines

The contract for the first two giant tunnelling machines for London’s HS2 tunnels has been signed with HS2’s Main Works Civils Contractor, Skanska Costain STRABAG JV (SCS JV),  marking significant progress on the southern stretch of HS2.

The tunnel boring machines (TBMs) are being built by world leading manufacturer Herrenknecht and will be delivered to the site in the UK by the end of 2021. They are being designed and manufactured specifically for the London clay and chalk ground conditions they will bore through.

The London tunnels for HS2 are twin bored, and will be 13 miles each way, and with a combined total of 26 miles, our London tunnel’s will be the same length as Crossrail. This programme of tunnelling between central London and the M25 will be undertaken by SCS JV. Overall there will be 10 TBMs purchased to construct the 64 miles of tunnelling along the HS2 route between the West Midlands and London.

Construction London Tunnel Maps.

The London tunnels will begin just outside of Euston station and will be below ground until they emerge in West London at Old Oak Common station. The route will continue underground from Old Oak Common to the outskirts of West London.

These first two London TBMs will be launched from a portal at West Ruislip and will travel five miles east, creating the western section of the  Northolt Tunnel. Once they arrive at Green Park Way in Greenford the machines will be extracted from the ground and the site will then be used as a vent shaft. The 8.4 mile tunnel will be completed with a 3.4 mile tunnel drive from Old Oak Common using two further TBMs, which are yet to be procured.

A second tunnel between Euston and Old Oak Common will complete the remaining 4.5 miles of London tunnel between the two HS2 stations.

James Richardson, managing director of Skanska Costain STRABAG joint venture (SCS JV), said: “As the construction partner responsible for the majority of tunnels on the HS2 project, our contract for the first two TBMs is a major milestone for us. This partnership with Herrenknecht has brought together leading expertise in both our organisations and together we are constructing some of the most advanced TBMs in the world to efficiently drive the tunnels under London.

3D Construction London Tunnel Maps.

“Work is already well underway to prepare for the first tunnel launch in 2022. Throughout these and all our activities we are committed to involving local communities and stakeholders and supporting social development and employment through the 4,500 jobs that will be created.”

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttp://therailengineer.com

SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews


Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST.

A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series.

Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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