Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJ

SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviews Nigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST. A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series. Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

Latest Articles

Italian rail firm to benefit from Britain’s electrification programme

Electrification will be one of the big stories covered by the rail engineer over the next few years. Millions will be spent on projects...

Olympic renewals

The Olympics and Paralympics are over, and life on the railways can now get back to normal. That, of course, means night- time and...

Bombardier TRAXX DE ME – Four is better than one

Britain has largely forgotten that locomotives can usefully pull passenger trains. With most of the TOCs almost exclusively using DMUs and EMUs in various...

Pendolinos undergo major bogie overhaul

Bogies have featured a few times in the rail engineer recently. There were two articles on bogie production at the Siemens factory in Graz...

What to expect at InnoTrans 2012

Every two years, the world’s railway industry gathers on the outskirts of Berlin for InnoTrans. Billed as the “world’s leading trade fair for rail...

D2WO explained

The route from Doncaster to Water Orton runs for 110 miles through the East and West Midlands. It passes through Rotherham, bypasses Sheffield down...

Four bridges One valley

Regular readers of the rail engineer will have read reports on many infrastructure projects carried out all around the country in a variety of...

Flying high

Network Rail’s annual Partnership Awards moved out of London again this year, to the Imperial War Museum at Duxford, just south of Cambridge. The evening...

Developing infrastructure projects

Simon Kirby, Network Rail’s managing director, infrastructure projects, spoke in the rail engineer seminar theatre at Infrarail recently and outlined his thoughts and objectives...

ETCS coming to the UK

Although Network Rail is a member of the ERTMS Users Group, as described in Clive Kessell’s article, the Cambrian Line is the only ERTMS...

Maintaining savings in the rail industry

Whenever one talks about the cost of British railways, the same comments come up - “efficiency”, “savings”, "McNulty”, “uncompetitive”, “expensive”. Network Rail is no stranger...

Building Bogies

Last month, the rail engineer visited Graz, the historic capital of Styria and Austria’s second city, for the launch of the new SF7000 bogie...

New circuits and old bombs

Rail projects seem to have a habit of changing over time. A seemingly simple project can alter almost beyond recognition before it is completed,...

Specially Interesting

As the world becomes a greener place, with green initiatives, a green agenda and even green trains(!), landowners and businesses are being encouraged to...

It’s Vital!

This year’s Infrarail show is approaching rapidly, and a look through the list of exhibitors reveals that Vital Rail will be one of them. Vital...

Gröna Tåget (The Green Train)

The Swedes are very good at collaboration. So it should be no surprise that a project to develop a new concept of train that...