Graeme Bickerdike

SPECIALIST AREAS Tunnels and bridges, historic structures and construction techniques, railway safety Graeme Bickerdike's association with the railway industry goes back to the mid-nineties when he was contracted to produce safety awareness videos and printed materials aimed at the on-track community. This led to him heading a stream of work to improve the way safety rules are communicated and understood - ultimately simplifying them - for which he received the IRSE’s Wing Award for Safety in 2007. In 2005, Graeme launched a website to catalogue and celebrate some of the more notable disused railway structures which still grace Britain’s landscape. Several hundred have since had their history researched and a photographic record captured. A particular focus has been the construction methods adopted by Victorian engineers and contractors; as a result, the site has become a useful resource for those with asset management responsibilities. Graeme has been writing for Rail Engineer for the past ten years, generally looking at civil engineering projects and associated issues. He has a deep appreciation of the difficulties involved in building tunnels and viaducts through the 19th Century, a trait which is often reflected in his stories.

Latest Articles

Never the twain… meet

Today’s railway system might be a singular entity but it was formed from many discrete parts, pushed through the Victorian landscape by competing companies...

Ground force

Its colour scheme might get repainted by the seasons but we tend to view Britain’s natural landscape as a constant, not changing much from...

Turning back time

It won’t sweeten the bitter fares pill commuters have to swallow. Ministers won’t be queuing to have their faces seen on site. There’s no...

Keeping up appearances

Architecture inevitably splits opinion. As an analogue child, I find myself smitten with the exquisite Victorian façades that radiate affluence into West Yorkshire’s mill...

Upheaval!

Collieries and railways, in their various forms, have a long history of happy coexistence. Wooden wagonways were commonly carrying minerals to river wharves back...

Holiday in the Bahamas

Ones and noughts are now omnipresent, forming a thick digital cloud in the ether. Binary streams surge down optical fibres, pouring into data mines...

Derailed: The complicity dividend

History has made heroes of the men who powered Britain’s economic and social revolution through the 18th and 19th centuries. Names that still inspire:...

The Fourth Dimension

Frederick Francis became a statistic at the age of 36. His was one of 1,032 lives taken by Britain’s railways in 1879. Back then,...

If not, then what?

In North Shields, the whole of the shops were closed and nearly every window exhibited some sign of rejoicing, either in the shape of...

Hidden Haddon: its rise and fall

If the procrastination over High Speed 2 ever gives way to construction, the line will navigate the Chiltern Hills via a series of tunnels...

That sinking feeling

Stanlow Abbey was not a lucky place. Built on the Mersey’s south bank, the last decade of the thirteenth century brought flooding, storm damage...

Upstairs Downstairs

It could only be London - the energy, the din, the bustling humanity. One of the city’s red double-deckers plots a course through the...

The dismantling plan

There was genuine dismay in parts of the North-East when Auf Wiedersehen, Pet re-emerged from TV oblivion in 2002. Not because of Jimmy Nail’s singing...

All that glitters

The Chinese must be feeling very smug indeed, gazing westwards at the warm glow of Capitalism burning. In the second quarter of 2011, economic growth...