Home Business Jewers Doors now fitted to Lusail depot Qatar

Jewers Doors now fitted to Lusail depot Qatar

Jewers Doors, the family-run business based in Bedfordshire, has just completed the supply of 30 sets of Swift-SEW automatic bi-folding doors for the new Lusail Light Rail Transit (LRT) depot complex in Qatar.

Currently under construction as part of an urban development project north of Doha, the capital of Qatar, the €2 billion Lusail LRT design-build scheme is expected to open in 2020 and will provide transportation for the people living in, and commuting to, the new Lusail City, where the new 80,000 seat Lusail Stadium will host the 2022 FIFA World Cup Final.

One of the 30 sets of Jewers Doors supplied to the Lusail LRT project in Qatar.

Working with its local reseller, Rumaillah Warehouse Equipment WLL, Jewers started design works with the QDVC-Alstom consortium in 2012, winning the order in 2017 and shipping the doors from its UK manufacturing base in early 2018. 

The thirty sets of 6.45m high electrically operated Swift-SEW doors have been installed on three depot buildings.  Six sets are on the Service Station, which incorporates the wash bay, twelve sets within the Maintenance Building and a further twelve sets on the Stabling Depot, which houses the trams when they are not on the dusty streets of Qatar.  

Individual doors automatically open and close as a tram slowly passes through a sequence of photo-beams on either side of the door opening.  These beams also act as safety devices to prevent the doors closing until the tram has fully cleared all beams, and together with full height safety edges provide ultimate safety for trams and personnel alike.

Door leaves are finished in a special ‘cool finish’ coating to reduce heat absorption through the door, and are fitted with multi-wall EPDM rubber seals to all edges to reduce, air and dust and water ingress. 

A high level cut-out, lined with a dielectrically rated rubber sheet tested to 30kVA, allows the door to safely close around the overhead line equipment (OLE).  This cut-out is designed to prevent bird entry and reduce dust ingress.  As standard, the door is earthed back to the structure with suitably rated earth bonding braids. 

Jewers doors can be found in railway depots throughout the world, including UK and Europe, Middle and Far East and Australasia.

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJ
Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttps://www.railengineer.co.uk
SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviewsNigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST. A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series. Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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