Home Rail News Network Rail graduates try out Welsh train simulator

Network Rail graduates try out Welsh train simulator

A group of Network Rail graduates had the opportunity to try out Transport for Wales’ train simulator this week.

The graduates, who work in a range of functions for Network Rail, were given the chance to drive both the Class 175 and Class 150 simulators under the watchful eyes of operations training manager Adam Bagwell and seasonal delivery manager Neil Driscoll.

The simulators are normally used for a 36-week driver training programme. On this occasion, they were set up to give the graduates specific practice on low adhesion tracks. giving them a greater understanding of the challenges drivers go through during the autumn period.

To help explain the difficulties, the group was accompanied by two members of the Network Rail autumn control and Daniel Booth, Network Rail’s seasonal delivery specialist for the Wales route.


After the driving experience, Adam Bagwell commented: “It was great to get the guys along and to share some of the skills that go into driving our trains during very difficult and challenging weather conditions.”

Neil Driscoll added: “I was really pleased with how the day went and it is fantastic to be working closely with Network Rail to help the development of graduates. This typifies the joint working between ourselves and Network Rail on helping to build a better service for our customers.”

Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJ
Nigel Wordsworth BSc(Hons) MCIJhttps://www.railengineer.co.uk
SPECIALIST AREAS Rolling stock, mechanical equipment, project reports, executive interviewsNigel Wordsworth graduated with an honours degree in Mechanical Engineering from Nottingham University, after which he joined the American aerospace and industrial fastener group SPS Technologies. After a short time at the research laboratories in Pennsylvania, USA, Nigel became responsible for applications engineering to industry in the UK and Western Europe. At this time he advised on various engineering projects, from Formula 1 to machine tools, including a particularly problematic area of bogie design for the HST. A move to the power generation and offshore oil supply sector followed as Nigel became director of Entwistle-Sandiacre, a subsidiary of the Australian-owned group Aurora plc. At the same time, Nigel spent ten years as a Technical Commissioner with the RAC Motor Sports Association, responsible for drafting and enforcing technical regulations for national and international motor racing series. Joining Rail Engineer in 2008, Nigel’s first assignment was a report on new three-dimensional mobile mapping and surveying equipment, swiftly followed by a look at vegetation control machinery. He continues to write on a variety of topics for most issues.

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