Home Infrastructure Video: West Yorkshire stations

Video: West Yorkshire stations

The £20 million southern entrance to Leeds Station has been officially opened, serving new residential and commercial developments alongside the River Aire. It’s expected that one-in-five passengers – about 20,000 people daily – will use it.

The construction process has been complex, both in terms of logistics and engineering. Materials had to be brought in by barge from a holding area quarter-of-a-mile away and then lifted into position by a tower crane located in a service yard behind an apartment block.

Yorkshire is currently the focus of a significant rail investment programme. This will bring new trains, additional services and the return of three former stations. At Low Moor, works have been ongoing since August, but the project team has had to deal with years of fly tipping, a leaking high-pressure gas main and disused mine workings.

Low Moor is likely to welcome its first passengers in the summer. Apperley Bridge Station, on the commuter route between Leeds and Bradford Forster Square, opened in December and another, at Kirkstall Forge, is close to completion.

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Graeme Bickerdike
Graeme Bickerdikehttp://www.railengineer.co.uk

SPECIALIST AREAS
Tunnels and bridges, historic structures and construction techniques, railway safety


Graeme Bickerdike's association with the railway industry goes back to the mid-nineties when he was contracted to produce safety awareness videos and printed materials aimed at the on-track community. This led to him heading a stream of work to improve the way safety rules are communicated and understood - ultimately simplifying them - for which he received the IRSE’s Wing Award for Safety in 2007.

In 2005, Graeme launched a website to catalogue and celebrate some of the more notable disused railway structures which still grace Britain’s landscape. Several hundred have since had their history researched and a photographic record captured. A particular focus has been the construction methods adopted by Victorian engineers and contractors; as a result, the site has become a useful resource for those with asset management responsibilities.

Graeme has been writing for Rail Engineer for the past ten years, generally looking at civil engineering projects and associated issues. He has a deep appreciation of the difficulties involved in building tunnels and viaducts through the 19th Century, a trait which is often reflected in his stories.

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